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Stop and Pay Attention

Posted on December 24, 2018

The average age of Parkinson’s disease diagnosis is 60, but many individuals begin exhibiting signs of the neurological condition much younger than that. But, why do so many individuals go undiagnosed for years – even decades? It is because many people overlook the initial symptoms. Learn the early signs of Parkinson’s disease in this blog from PASC.

What Is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s disease is a condition that causes tremors, difficulty moving, uneven gait and imbalance, and a long list of other effects. Parkinson’s develops when the dopaminergic neurons of the brain become damaged or die. The cause of the condition is unknown, but some researchers believe the cause to be environmental, such as from exposure to certain toxins, like herbicides, fungicides and pesticides.

What Are the Early Signs of Parkinson’s Disease?

Some early signs of Parkinson’s disease include:

• Changes in handwriting, especially to small or cramped handwriting
• Sudden tremor, particularly in a finger, hand or foot
• Uncontrollable movements during sleep
• Stiff limbs
• Slowing of movement, a condition known as bradykinesia
• Changes to the voice
• Stiff or rigid facial expression
• Stooped posture
• Blinking less often

The early signs of Parkinson’s disease can be easy to miss for many individuals. This is because they can occur sporadically or intermittently. Some of the effects may also be so slight they are not immediately noticed.

If you notice the signs of Parkinson’s disease in yourself or a loved one, we encourage you to make an appointment for a checkup immediately. While there is no current cure for Parkinson’s disease, and it is a serious condition, intervention can help significantly if the symptoms are caught early.

Find out how PASC is using personal cell therapy for those living with Parkinson’s disease by calling 888-386-4751 for more information or to schedule a consultation.

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